::: Home > Exhibition > Exhibit Info
Text size :

Exhibitions of Loaned Artifacts

The Enduring Beauty of Celadon: A Special Exhibition of Goryeo Celadons
The Enduring Beauty of Celadon: A Special Exhibition of Goryeo Celadons
Extension:Exhibitions of Loaned Artifacts 2015/12/28~ 2018/03/11
Showroom:No information
Exhibition Description

 

Exhibition Description

 

  • Introduction

    Exhibitions of Loaned Artifacts / S201

    Goryeo celadon is the most representative ceramic ware produced in the Korean Peninsula during the Goryeo period (918-1392). The kilns were mainly located in South Korea’s Kangjin-gun, Chunranam-do and Buan-gun, Chunrabuk-do today. These regions witnessed the development of a significant number of kilns and their products. Monochrome works dominated the manufacture between the 10th and 12th centuries. Such precious wares found in the royal tomb of Emperor Shengzong of Liao (982-1031) point to the circulation of Goryeo celadon and the possible time of entering China.

    Gaoli Tujing (Illustrated Text of the Xuanhe Emissary to Korea), written by Xu Jing (1091-1153)—a Chinese envoy who was ispatched to the Goryeo empire when Northern Song China was under the reign of Emperor Huizong (1100-1125)—gave a very high opinion of Goryeo celadon and particularly noted the celadon’s “kingfisher color” (bisaek)—a translucent grayish-green, jade-like color. The naturalism reflected on Goryeo celadon has been likened to China’s Ru ware, the color of which is said to resemble the “clear sky after rain.”

    In addition to glazing, the precious Korean ware also incorporated various decorative techniques such as incision (intaglio), relievo (relief decoration), carving, openwork, inlay and underglaze painting with iron or copper. Such sensuous and whimsical decorations reflect the natural elements in arts during the Goryeo period. Korean potters developed unique techniques that reflected native tastes, in particular inlaid (sanggam) decoration. Inlaid celadon dominated the production of Goryeo celadon in the 13th and 14th centuries. The precious ware was once praised as “the best under heaven” by a Chinese intellectual.

    The Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, Japan, well-known for its Goryeo celadon collection, lent a selection of some two hundred pieces to celebrate the grand opening of the Asian Arts and Culture Museum, Southern Branch of National Palace Museum. The curator of the exhibition has specially arranged for these Goryeo wares to be displayed along with the Ru celadon collection of National Palace Museum. Highlighting the high praise of celadon wares in Northern Song China and Goryeo Korea, the exhibition shows the contrast between Goryeo and Ru celadons. The grand event offers a precious opportunity for visitors to appreciate the beauty of these fine celadon works.

 
  • Part 1 : Simple Elegance

  • Wine Cup and Stand

  • Wine Cup and Stand

    12th century, Goryeo dynasty (918-1392), Korea
    Total H. 9.2 cm
    Cup: H. 4.8 cm; Diam. 8.3 cm
    Stand: H. 5.0 cm; Diam. 15.1 cm
    Collection of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, Acc. No. 20223

    The stand, which is larger than the wine cup in proportion, has a wide circular disk, and in the center is a platform in the shape of a upside-down bowl. Wine cups and stands were produced in large quantities during the Goryeo period due to high praise of Northern-Song China's tea and wine culture. Cups and stands can be found in celadon and white porcelain as well as metal ware. The production of celadon cup stands started no later than the 11th century. This piece is covered with grayish green color—so called "kingfisher color"—which is especially translucent where the glaze pools. There were three quartz spur marks under the cup and five under the stand.

  • Gourd-shaped Ewer

  • Gourd-shaped Ewer

    12th century, Goryeo dynasty (918-1392), Korea
    H. 27.1 cm; L. 15.8 cm; W. 18.5 cm
    Collection of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka

    Gourd- and melon-shaped ewers were popular in Goryeo. Despite the great quantity of gourd-shaped ewers or bottles produced in China during the Tang and Song dynasties, this piece demonstrates a style and body lines unique to Goryeo. The ewer has a lid shaped like a lotus leaf incised in detail. The association between lotus leaves and wine cups in ancient Chinese culture suggests that this piece was used as wine ware. Both the gourd and the lotus yield a lot of seeds and symbolize prosperity of descendants. The handle is shaped like vines intertwined with one another. The flat, unglazed base reveals fireclay spur marks.

  • Mallet-shaped Vase

  • Incense Burner with Mandarin Duck-shaped Cover

    12th-13th centuries, Goryeo dynasty (918-1392), Korea
    H. 19.3 cm; W. 16.2 cm
    Collection of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, Acc. No. 20121

    This is one of a few incense burners with covers modeled on animals. The details of the bird is made with wide-width knives held at an angle and incision, exemplifying the advanced carving techniques during that time. When the incense is burned, it will pass through the mandarin duck's body and eventually exit from the beak.

 
  • Part 2 : Carved Charm

  • Long-necked Bottle with Incised Lotus Design

  • Long-necked Bottle with Incised Lotus Design

    12th century, Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), Korea
    H. 27.4 cm; Diam. 14.6 cm
    Collection of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, Acc. No. 20062

    This piece has an elongated neck and a globular body, evincing beautiful and harmonious proportions. It is a precious object for its stopper still remains. Incised on the surface are three lotus sprays, with leaves, flowers , and buds depicted at different angles. This is a superb example of Goryeo celadon of an alluring color. It is fully covered with thick glaze and the base reveals five quartz spur marks.

  • Gourd-shaped Bottle with Grapevine Scroll Design

  • Gourd-shaped Bottle with Grapevine Scroll Design

    12th century, Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), Korea
    H. 36.2 cm; Diam. 17.4 cm
    Collection of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, Acc. No. 20340

    This gourd-shaped bottle has a long, slender waist that connects the two bulbous parts of the body, forming an elegant, smooth curve. The loop below the small mouth rim is purportedly to be corded to secure the lid. The hole of the loop, however, is clogged with glaze. The body is incised all over with grapevine scrolls except for a band of lotus petals near the bottom. It is glazed all over in translucent grayish green color. The foot rim exposes the clay body and there are fireclay spur marks.

  • Incense Burner with Carved Taotie Design

  • Incense Burner with Carved Taotie Design

    12th-13th centuries, Goryeo dynasty (918-1392), Korea
    H. 12.0 cm; Diam. 12.4 cm
    Collection of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, Acc. No. 20533

    Shaped like a round ding, this incense burner has two upright handles on the flat mouth and three bent legs under the flattened bottom. Each of the spear-shaped feet has a raised border in the middle. A groove around the middle divides the body into upper and lower parts. Six vertical raised borders on the body are likened to bronze ware. The surface of The piece is decorated with stamped patterns—taotie beasts among repeating geometric patterns. Despite its resemblance to bronze ware, the decoration on this piece is simplified and hence iconographic. It is covered all over with a glaze of grayish alluring color. The base reveals four spur marks.

 
  • Part 3 : Flourished Diversity

    In 1170, military officers overthrew King Uijong of Goryeo and the military reign began in Korea. In contrast to Goryeo celadon in the 12th century, which showed the royal court and higher society's preference for delicate glazes and shape designs, the new regime in the 13th century highlighted decorating techniques and innovations, showing the new aristocracy's admiration of luxuriant designs. The most representative works of this period were inlaid celadon ware.

    To meet the visual esthetic demand, these wares were made using the inlaid decoration combined with existing carving and impressing techniques as well as animal/plant designs. Also incorporated during this period were new techniques such as copper red paint, openwork, and reverse inlay, contributing to the amazing diversity of decoration.

  • Meiping Vase with Inlaid Clouds and Cranes Design

  • Meiping Vase with Inlaid Clouds and Cranes Design

    12-13th century, Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), Korea
    H. 30.0 cm; Diam. 18.6 cm
    Collection of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka Acc. No. 20767

    This vase is decorated with delicate patterns of clouds and cranes. The mouth has trace of repair. The theme is inlaid lingzhi clouds floating and cranes flying in the sky. The cloud-and-crane motif was popular in Goryeo and was a common motif on ceramics. One explanation is that the motif was popular due to the influence of the Chinese Taoism. The piece is covered with grayish green glaze.

  • Four-handled Pot with Inlaid Chrysanthemum Design

  • Four-handled Pot with Inlaid Chrysanthemum Design

    13th century, Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), Korea
    H. 17.5 cm; Diam. 13.3 cm
    Collection of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, Acc. No. 20708

    This small vessel has a wide mouth and a swollen shoulder which tapers towards a slightly flared bottom, forming an S-shaped curve. The four small handles on the shoulder can be corded to secure the cover, which is unfortunately missing. All the patterns were executed in inlay—clouds on the shoulder, lotus petals around the bottom, and chrysanthemum roundels on the belly. Reverse inlaid between these roundels are baoxianghua scrolls, leaving almost no blank space in the background. All these were popular motifs and patterns during that period of time. It is covered with thick grayish green glaze. The unglazed base and foot rim reveal spur marks.

  • Oil Bottle with Inlaid and Underglaze Copper Red Spotted Chrysanthemum Design

  • Oil Bottle with Inlaid and Underglaze Copper Red Spotted Chrysanthemum Design

    12th century, Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), Korea
    H. 5.1 cm; Diam. 7.9 cm
    Collection of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka Acc. No. 20820

    The vessel has a dish-shaped mouth and a wide, almost flattened body on a short foot. It is covered with grayish green glaze with no cracks. It is mainly decorated with small circles and chrysanthemum patterns. Adorned on the shoulder is a band of flowers, the center of each painted with dark red copper paint. Such design is rare among Goryeo celadon wares. The base and the foot rim reveal spur marks

 
  • Part 4 : Black Element

  • Bowls with Underglaze Iron-painted Plant Design

  • Bowls with Underglaze Iron-painted Plant Design

    12th century, Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), Korea
    H. 7.8 cm; Diam. 18.5 cm
    H. 6.7 cm; Diam. 17.9 cm
    H. 5.2 cm; Diam. 16.2 cm
    Collection of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka Acc. No. 20491

    The shape design was purportedly inspired by metal ware. The exterior wall is depicted with plants in iron paint. The vessel is covered with translucent grayish-green glaze. The year of production has been inscribed on the surface. These bowls were used as table ware for monks, usually in a set of three or four, serving rice, soup, vegetables, etc. They have a countersunk base and a base that reveals white fire-clay spur marks.

  • Meiping Vase with Underglaze Iron-painted Chrysanthemum Scroll Design

  • Meiping Vase with Underglaze Iron-painted Chrysanthemum Scroll Design

    12th century, Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), Korea
    H. 28.2 cm; Diam. 18.4 cm
    Collection of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka Acc. No. 20303

    This vessel has a dish-shaped mouth and a swollen shoulder which tapers towards a countersunk base, forming an S-shaped curve. All the decoration was executed with iron paint. The top of the shoulder is adorned with a band of chrysanthemum petals and the body is with chrysanthemum arabesques. The part near the bottom is covered with iron paint. This piece is covered with yellowish-brown glaze, which was fired in an oxidizing atmosphere. The mouth rim has traces of repairs and the base reveals spur marks.

  • Ewer with Underglaze Iron-painted Peony Scroll Design

  • Ewer with Underglaze Iron-painted Peony Scroll Design

    12th century, Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), Korea
    H. 16.8 cm; Diam. 15.8 cm
    Collection of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka Acc. No. 20150

    There are two types of iron-painted ewers—one that has a wide-stretching shoulder and the other a melon-like shape. This vessel is decorated with peony scrolls in iron paint. The simple lines of iron paint made extensive appearance between the end of the 11th century to the 12th century. This masterpiece is rare for its grayish-green glaze, which is rare in iron-painted celadon.

 



top